Category: Louisiana

Myrtles Plantation in Louisiana

Myrtles Plantation in Louisiana

The Myrtles Haunted Plantation

A forty minute car drive north of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, in the small town of St Francisville, there is a beautiful antebellum plantation dating from 1796. General David Bradford, a man known for his role as a radical leader in the Whiskey Rebellion’s March on Pittsburgh, built the Myrtles in 1796.

The main house is Creole cottage style, with a 125-foot long veranda that extends the entire length of the façade, and wraps around the southern end of the house. An ornamental cast-iron railing, with an elaborate grape-cluster design complements the porch and adds tons of southern charm.

The Myrtles haunted Plantation cast iron railed verandah

The Myrtles has 22 rooms spread over two floors. The spacious entry hall runs the length of the house and features a French Baccarat crystal chandelier weighing more than 300 pounds. The flooring and most of the windows in the house are original.

The plantation landscape features a large pond with a small island accessible by a bridge. (How romantic!) The oldest structure on the grounds sits just to the rear of the main house. General Bradford lived in this location while he waited for the main house to be completed.  Nowadays it goes by the name The General’s Store, where you can purchase tickets for a guided tour and/or souvenirs from your visit.

But it’s not the original owner of the property or its stunning architecture that put Myrtles Plantation on the map as a place to visit.  It’s Chloe.

The Ghost of a Slave Girl

Chloe was a slave on the property and one version of the story goes that she was also the mistress of the plantation owner. Chloe was caught eavesdropping on her master and, as punishment, her ear was cut off. Shortly afterward, Chloe baked a birthday cake containing extract of oleander leaves, which are extremely poisonous. She hoped to make the family ill and then nurse them back to health, thereby regaining their favor.  However, her plan backfired. Only Sara and her two daughters ate the cake, and all died from the poison. When it was discovered how the family members had been poisoned, Chloe was then hanged.

A photograph taken in 1992 appears to show the figure of a slave girl in between two of the buildings on the property.

ghost of chloe at myrtles haunted plantation
Do you see the ghost of Chloe?

The figure is the right size and proportion to be human, yet it appears to be transparent – you can see the lines of the exterior siding running right through what would be her torso.

Also, guests at the Inn often report that one of their earrings disappears.  Perhaps because one is all that Chloe needs?

But Chloe’s not alone. A mirror located in the house supposedly holds the spirits of Sara Woodruff and two of her children. According to custom at the time, people covered all of the mirrors in a house after someone passed away. Legend says that after the Woodruffs died, staff overlooked this particular mirror. Legend has it that the spirits of Sara and her children were trapped in the uncovered mirror.  Ghostly figures are occasionally seen in the mirror, while at other times there appear to be handprints on it.

The Seventeenth Step

William Drew Winter was an attorney who lived in the plantation from 1865 until 1871. A stranger shot him.  Trying to reach help, he staggered inside the house and attempted to climb the stairs. He died on the 17th step. Today, visitors and employees in the hotel say that they can hear his dying footsteps.

You can visit the plantation to learn more about the ghosts (or maybe even spot one yourself!), or you can stay there.  Rooms range from $148 for a Garden Room to $290 for a suite.  If you are traveling with more than one person, you can rent a cottage ($295; sleeps 4) or the caretaker’s house ($400; sleeps 6).

The Myrtles Plantation is located at 7747 U.S. Highway 61, St. Francisville, Louisiana 70775.  Telephone 1-800-809-0565.

50 of the Strangest Place Names in America… and How They Came to Be

50 of the Strangest Place Names in America… and How They Came to Be

I love looking at maps and checking out the names of places.  Some of them are unique, while others are funny and a few are just downright weird.  Here are some of my favorites, including how they got their names.

Scratch Ankle, Alabama got its name from train workers who always saw the locals scratching their ankles from mosquito bites.

Mary’s Igloo, Alaska took its name from an Inupiat woman named Mary, who welcomed miners, trappers and others into her home for coffee. During that period, Mary’s Igloo was a transfer point for supplies for the gold fields upriver.

Why, Arizona derives its name from the fact that two major highways, State Routes 85 and 86, originally intersected in a Y shape. As a result of Arizona law that required city names to have at least three letters, the town’s founders named the town “Why” as opposed to simply calling it “Y.”

strange town names why arizona

Smackover, Arkansas comes from the name that French settlers gave the town in 1686: “sumac couvert,” which translates to “covered in sumac bushes.”

Weed, California has nothing to do with marijuana or poor landscaping.  Rather, the town gets its name from the founder of the local lumber mill and pioneer Abner Weed, who discovered that the area’s strong winds were helpful in drying lumber. The town motto is “Weed like to welcome you.” (ha ha ha!)

Troublesome, Colorado takes its name from nearby Troublesome Creek.  The creeek got its name because soldiers had difficulty crossing it.

Yeehaw Junction, Florida got its name in the 1950s. Some say the community’s name comes from how locals would yell “Yeehaw!”  Others believe the name is close to the Seminole language word meaning “wolf”. According to town historians and several original newspaper articles, the town’s original name was either “Jackass Junction” or “Jackass Crossing.” That strange town name stemmed from local ranchers ring burros to visit the Desert Inn (the local brothel).

Experiment, Georgia took its name from the University of Georgia’s Agricultural Experiment Station, which is located there.

Dickshooter, Idaho received its name from Dick Shooter, a man who “established a homestead there.”

Goofy Ridge, Illinois was a camp near the river bank where moonshiners and other carousers met weekly to do their drinking. One night, a local game warden declared his relative sobriety by vowing that he could shoot a walnut off the head of a volunteer. The game warden placed the target on the volunteer’s head, aimed his .22 rifle, and shot the nut right off. A witness described the incident as “one damned goofy thing to do,” and the camp was consequently known as Goofy Ridge.

French Lick, Indiana (also hometown of NBA legend Larry Bird) was originally a French trading post built near a spring and salt lick.

strange town names french lick indiana

Fertile, Iowa got its name due to the quality of the soil in the valley there.

Protection, Kansas received its name from a political issue in the 1884 presidential selection.  There was a lot of popular support for a protective tariff, and the town drew its name from that.

Monkey’s Eyebrow, Kentucky got its name because when looking at a map of Ballard County, it resembles a monkey’s head. The town Monkey’s Eyebrow is, of course, where the monkey’s eyebrow would be.

Boring, Maryland‘s name was not chosen for the pace of life, but for postmaster David Boring.

Hell, Michigan offers multiple theories for the origin of its name. My favorite: the original settler, George Reeves, was asked what to name the town when Michigan achieved statehood. His response was a surly, “I don’t care, you can name it Hell for all I care.”

strange town names hell michigan

Sleepy Eye, Minnesota took its name from Sleepy Eye Lake, which was named after Chief Sleepy Eye of the Sioux. Chief Sleepy Eye was known as a compassionate person with droopy eyelids.

Tightwad, Missouri got its name when a store owner cheated a customer, who was a postman, by charging him an extra 50 cents for a better watermelon. (Some sources claim the transaction involved a rooster rather than a watermelon.)

Two Dot, Montana got its name from the cattle brand of George R. Wilson, who donated the land for the town. “Two Dot Wilson” had a cattle brand of two dots, placed side by side on the hip of his cattle.

Searchlight, Nevada (hometown of US Senator Harry Reid) received its when George Frederick Colton was looking for gold in the area in 1897. He supposedly said that it would take a searchlight to find gold ore there.

Loveladies, New Jersey began as a small, 10-acre island in the bay adjacent to a US Life-Saving Station was owned by a man named Thomas Lovelady. The area was called Lovelady’s, which eventually evolved to Loveladies.

strange town names loveladies new jersey

Rush, New York was either named after the rushes growing along the creek, or after Dr. Benjamin Rush, Founding Father of the United States.

Whynot, North Carolina came from residents debating a title for their community. A man asked, “Why not name the town Whynot and let’s go home?” Nearby towns at the time with equally interesting names include Erect, Hemp, and Lonely.

Zap, North Dakota got its name because of a coal mine at the edge of town. The railroad company official in charge of naming new villages knew a coal-mining town in Scotland called Zapp, and thought that would be a good name here. However, he chose to Americanize the name and spelled it with only one “p”.

Pee Pee Township, Ohio took its name from Pee Pee Creek.  The creek got its name when an early settler inscribed his initials (P. P.) on a tree along its banks.

Okay, Oklahoma took its name from the OK Truck Manufacturing Company. Okay? OK.

Idiotville, Oregon got its name because of its remote location.  People said that only an idiot would work there.

Intercourse, Pennsylvania in Amish country, received its name in 1814. In those days, the word ‘intercourse’ meant the social interaction and support shared in the community of faith.

Ninetysix, South Carolina has several different theories for the origin of its name. My favorite is that it is an interpretation of a Welsh expression, “nant-sych,” meaning “dry gulch.”

strange town names ninety-seix south carolina

 

Two Strike, South Dakota received its name in honor of Lakota Chief Two Strike, whose native name was “Nomkahpa,” meaning “Knocks Two Off.” The chief’s claim to fame was that, in a battle with the Utes, he knocked two warriors off their horses with a single blow of his war club.

Sweet Lips, Tennessee received its name from settlers who declared water from a creek to be “sweet to the lips.”  Alternative versions of the story say it was wandering hobos or thirsty Civil War soldiers.

Uncertain, Texas derives its name from surveyors who were attempting to delineate the border between Texas and Louisiana.  They were uncertain as to which side of the line they were on, hence the name.

Humptulips, Washington comes from a local Native American language, meaning ‘hard to pole’, referring to the difficulty local Native Americans had poling their canoes along the Humptulips River.

War, West Virginia took its name from the nearby War Creek.  The creek got its name from the frequent battles between Native Americans near the stream.

strange town names war west virginia

Spread Eagle, Wisconsin got its name from the Spread Eagle chain of lakes. When seen from above, the lakes resemble an eagle with its wings spread.