Tag: Mid-Atlantic

A Post-Election Celebration: Return Day in Georgetown, Delaware

A Post-Election Celebration: Return Day in Georgetown, Delaware

The tiny town of Georgetown, Delaware (population 6000) has a special holiday every election year called Return Day. In many ways, it’s a holiday the whole nation could learn from.

What is Return Day?

Dating back as far as perhaps 1792, Return Day came about after a law moved the Sussex County Delaware seat from the coastal town of Lewes to a more geographically centered site, Georgetown. That same law required all citizens to cast their votes in Georgetown on election day. Two days later, voters  could return to Georgetown to hear the official results of the election.

Voting districts were established in 1811, eliminating the need for a central polling & results location. And today’s technology enables us to know who won within hours of the polls closing. However, the tradition of meeting two days later in Georgetown to announce the final vote tally has continued for over 200 years. It has even achieved the status of state holiday, with government offices in the county closing for the afternoon.

Return Day is celebrated every election year in Georgetown, Delaware.

What Happens on Return Day?

The festivities start with a concert and a traditional free ox roast in the town circle. Like most local festivals, Return Day features food vendors, competitions, musical entertainment, arts and crafts, and  so on.

The candidates – winners and losers from both parties – ride in horse drawn carriages or antique cars in a parade through town and around the town circle.

Former Vice President Joe Biden has participated in Delaware's Return Day tradition more than once.
Former Vice President (and Delaware Senator) Joe Biden has participated in the Return Day celebration more than once.

As the parade draws to and end, the ceremonies open with the national anthem, followed by an invocation and opening remarks by the mayor of Georgetown. Then – can you believe it? – a town crier reads the election results.

On Return Day in Georgetown, Delaware, the town crier reads the results of the elections.

The chairmen of the political parties (Democrat, Republican, Libertarian, and Independent) in Sussex County then partake in a ceremonial burying the hatchet. They meet on stage, clutch a hatchet and together plunge it into a box of sand. Even the sand has symbolic significance, as it’s from the original county seat of Lewes. When party leaders bury the hatchet, that signifies the end of the political competition.

Following the ceremony, all attendees receive a free open pit roast beef sandwich. Another tradition for Return Day is the ox roast and, well, if you’re going to roast an ox, you might as well share it with your neighbors.

Why Talk About Return Day?

In a political environment that seems to get nastier and more divisive each year, there’s a lot we can learn from this little town in Delaware. On Return Day, political opponents come together and symbolically bury the hatchet, signifying the end of their competition, no matter how antagonistic it may have gotten. Additionally, the election is officially declared as finished business.

What’s the bigger message here? Once the election is over, it’s over. Let’s put the nastiness behind us, roll up our collective sleeves, and get to work at fixing the problems that face us.

The next Return Day will be held in Georgetown on November 5, 2020.

Return Day - a unique post-election celebration in Georgetown Delaware.
5 Reasons Why You Should Visit Chestertown, Maryland

5 Reasons Why You Should Visit Chestertown, Maryland

Recently, my day job took me to the small historic town of Chestertown, on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. The quiet beauty and historical elegance of the town impressed me so much that I thought I would share it with you via some photos.

Chestertown’s History

Chestertown, named for the Chester River, was founded in 1706. It enjoyed prominence as one of the Maryland colony’s six Royal Ports of Entry. By the middle of the eighteenth century, Chestertown was the second leading port in the colony. As such, it was a wealthy town, with a growing merchant class. Well off residents built brick mansions and townhouses along the riverfront.

Visit Chestertown Maryland: Elegant old townhouses line the streets near the riverfront.
Historic townhouses in Chestertown, Maryland (Source: By Acroterion – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0)

Additionally, Chestertown is home to Washington College, the tenth oldest liberal arts college in the nation and the oldest college in Maryland.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, the country’s largest private, nonprofit preservation organization, named Chestertown, Maryland, to its 2007 list of America’s Dozen Distinctive Destinations, an annual list of unique and lovingly preserved communities in the United States.

“Chestertown is a treasure hidden in plain sight,” said Richard Moe, president of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. “A small, historic and relatively unspoiled Eastern Shore town, Chestertown had the good sense to hang on to what makes it so special. The result is a vibrant community that offers travelers an ideal retreat.”

Need more convincing? Here are some of the reasons why you should visit Chestertown, Maryland:

1. Sultana

Visit Chestertown Maryland: The Schooner Sultana calls Chestertown home.
(Source: By Acroterion – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0)

Chestertown serves as home port to a schooner named Sultana. Docked at the end of Cannon Street, Sultana was built largely by local volunteers. They used designs based directly on a 1768 Royal Navy survey of the original Boston-built merchant vessel, the smallest schooner ever in the British Royal Navy. Because the builders had access to the survey, it is one of the most accurate 18th century replicas in the world today. The ship offers educational tours for area schoolchildren, which are based on more than 2,000 pages of the original vessel’s log books, correspondence, and crew lists.

2. The White Swan Tavern

Visit Chestertown Maryland: The White Swan Tavern Bed & Breakfast

The White Swan tavern has been a fixture in Chestertown since before the Revolutionary War. It is conveniently located in the center of downtown, within walking distance of shops and restaurants, the Chester River waterfront, and the weekly Saturday farmer’s market.

In 1978, the property was impeccably restored to its 1793 appearance, with one room devoted to the display of many artifacts found in an archaeological dig on the site. During the entire process of restoration, the owners acquired pieces of furniture, both antique and reproduction, which they thought appropriate to the building. They furnished the remainder of the building with the ideals of simplicity and comfort in mind. Following painstaking analysis, the original paint color was reproduced for wall paneling and trim. A set of early chargers recovered from the tavern site became the models for the contemporary stoneware dishes.

Visit Chestertown Maryland: the White Swan Tavern is a colonial era bed & breakfast
Breakfast at the White Swan Tavern

The inn serves an afternoon tea and offers six deluxe rooms for rent. My personal favorite is the John Lovegrove Kitchen, which features a open beam ceiling and brick floor.

3. The Tea Party

One of my favorite festivals on the Delmarva Peninsula is the Chestertown Tea Party.

Delmarva Festivals: Celebrating the rebels of the American Revolution at the Chestertown Tea Party.
Image courtesy of Chestertown Tea Party Festival

In 1774, when the citizens of Chestertown learned that the British had closed the port of Boston in retaliation for Bostonians dumping tea into the harbor, they issued The Chestertown Resolves. The Resolves stated that it was illegal to import, sell or consume tea. Further, the citizens of Chestertown gathered at the town center, marched down High Street to the brigantine Geddes, and tossed her cargo of tea into the Chester River. Every Memorial Day weekend, Chestertown residents not only celebrate the event, they reenact it.

4. Fountain Park

Visit Chestertown Maryland: a beautifully ornate fountain is the centerpiece of Fountain Park.

The fountain in the center of Chestertown’s Fountain Park is nothing less than stunning. One of the earliest depictions of the fountain appeared in the 1853 edition of Godey’s Lady’s Book. It soon became associated with the style and elegance of this community. The figure of Hebe, cupbearer to the Gods on Mount Olympus, stands at the top of the fountain, pouring water. In addition to the fountain, the park is also home to summer concerts and other community events throughout the year.

5. The Shops

Walking along High Street in Chestertown, you will see all manner of great shops and art galleries. The best thing about these shops is that they are not chain stores. They are unique, locally owned businesses with strong ties to their community.

I had enough time to check out a few of them, and especially enjoyed She She on High, which is part gift shop, part DIY studio, part vintage clothing store. Literally, everywhere I looked in the store, I saw something cool, displayed beautifully.

Visit Chestertown Maryland: High Street offers many great shops, including She She on High
One of the stunning displays inside She She on High

In addition to She She on High, you can find stores specializing in beautiful art glass, Maryland theme gifts, boutique clothing, vintage finds, and so much more.

Additional Reasons to Visit

Still not convinced? Well, here are a few more reasons to consider a visit to Chestertown, Maryland.

  • The people are very friendly. You could live there 50 years or more and never be considered a local, but you will always feel welcome.

Visit Chestertown Maryland, where the parking is free and the people are friendly.

  • It’s a great day trip destination from Baltimore, Philadelphia, and/or Washington DC. Driving from any of these major cities will take right around 2 hours (slightly less for Baltimore).
  • It has a thriving art community. From galleries lining High Street to RiverArts’ special events and workshops throughout the year, you can tell that Chestertown values the arts and is dedicated to seeing them thrive in the community.

Visit Chestertown Maryland: The small town on Maryland's Eastern Shore is rich in history and also has a thriving arts community.

Have you been to Chestertown? What did you think of it? Be sure to leave a comment below and tell me!

Visit Chestertown Maryland: 5 reasons you should check out this historic town.
Water Park Fun in Ocean City, Maryland

Water Park Fun in Ocean City, Maryland

Fun for Everyone!

Businesses in the resort town of Ocean City, Maryland come and go all the time. However, a select few have been there so long that locals and visitors alike would be stunned speechless if they ever closed. Jolly Roger Amusement Park is one of those businesses, and for good reason. It’s one of the best things to do in Ocean City Maryland.

Things to Do in Ocean City Maryland: The Jolly Roger Amusement Park is a must for families visiting the beach resort.

Splash Mountain Water Park

One of the cornerstones of Jolly Roger’s business is the Splash Mountain water park, located at 30th Street in Ocean City.

Maybe, you’re like I was. For years and years, I refused to go to Splash Mountain. I thought that it would be silly and a waste of money to go to a water park in Ocean City. Why pay for admission when you are literally just a couple of blocks away from an ocean that is free to swim in? When I finally did go, I wished I had gone to Splash Mountain sooner!

The Park

Considering the number of people that go through it each day, Splash Mountain is an incredibly clean park. Everything looks new and in top-notch operating condition, which is definitely something you want to see in a water park.

I was impressed with the safety measures of the park. Lifeguards and other staff members stand at every ride and pool to ensure that no one gets on a ride if they do not meet its height requirements.  Life jackets are available (and sometimes required) for the littlest park visitors. Visitors who want to take a tube into the wave pool, may only use a clear tube. At first I didn’t understand that restriction, but it occurred to me that clear tubes will not prevent the lifeguards from seeing if someone has slipped under the waves and is struggling to keep their head above water.

The park provides fun options for every age and comfort level. From the three kiddie pools with a maximum depth of 2 feet and the Lazy River ambling through the park, to the Ragin Raft and Aqualoop, there is something for everyone to enjoy.

The Rides

There are so many fun rides to choose from! Here’s your guide to all the features at Splash Mountain:

The Lost Lagoon Family Pool

The Lost Lagoon is a pirate-themed pool adventure. Splash in the shallow pool or take your pick of slides as you race towards the water. The Lost Lagoon is conveniently located by the food stands and restrooms.

The Black Hole

Things to Do in Ocean City Maryland: Splash Mountain's Black Hole challenges riders to travel at high speeds through the enclosed slide, which is completely dark!

This mega-slide is not for anyone with a fear of the dark. Two of its three slides are completely enclosed and pitch dark, while the third slide is open for the faint of heart! Flashes of light, high-speed fun, and unexpected dips and turns will quickly reveal why this is a Splash Mountain staple for visitors.

The Aqualoop

Hailed as the #1 water slide in the country by Popular Mechanics, the Aqualoop is the only one of its kind on the East Coast. The state-of-the-art enclosed, 360 degree, semi-transparent, looping water slide begins with an anxiety-ridden countdown before the trap door opens and sends you plummeting down feet-first, Wile E. Coyote style, 480-feet before splashing in the water below.

The Stealth

Things to Do in Ocean City Maryland: The Stealth at Splash Mountain is the water park version of skating on a half pipe.

The Stealth is Splash Mountain’s first extreme water slide, and it combines the fun of skateboarding with the fun of a water park ride. The half pipe slide with its 45-foot tall vertical ramp will give you the adrenaline pumping thrill of a steep descent, then being shot uphill into the sky.

The Speed Slide

Race your friends down the six lane Speed Slide to see who can reach the bottom first! It’s a classic water park favorite, pitting you against friends, family and even strangers, as you race to the finish.

The Eye of the Hurricane

Things to Do in Ocean City Maryland: The Eye of the Hurrican ride at Splash Mountain Water Park. Locals call it the Toilet Bowl.

Nearly everyone I know calls this ride the Toilet Bowl because, essentially, that’s what it resembles. You travel down a chute slide, emerging into a large round bowl. You circle around and around and are then “flushed” out into the Lazy River at the bottom.

The Lazy River

This one is my absolute favorite. Grab a tube and float your way along the 1100-foot, slow-moving river. I could stay on this all day!

And if I may insert a small PSA here… please take your tube out of the Lazy River with you when you leave it. Empty tubes clutter up the river and disturb the flow of traffic. Thanks!

The Rain Forest

Things to Do in Ocean City Maryland: The Rain Forest at Splash Mountain water park is great fun for young and old alike.

The beautiful thing about the Rain Forest is that adults enjoy it just as much as young kids do. It’s the ultimate treehouse, complete with slides, rope walks, and plenty of water guns! Walk, climb, or slide your way around the passageways of this massive treehouse – it’s a dream come true for any band of shipwrecked voyagers. The pirate head at the top of the structure is a giant bucket that fills with water. Watch out when he gets full!

The Wave Pool

If you don’t want to deal with massive heights or fast speeds, you might enjoy the wave pool. Body surf, duck under the crashing waves, and swim the day away in the Wave Pool. It’s got all the fun of the ocean…minus the salt water and sand.

Kiddie Pirate Ship Pool

Things to Do in Ocean City Maryland: One of Splash Mountain's kiddie pools has a pirate ship theme.

One of three kiddie pools at Splash Mountain, the pirate pool has a ship to explore and three slides. The water in this pool is no more than two feet deep… perfect for toddlers and those who are just learning to swim. (My kids are far past this stage but I still like visiting the kiddie pool before hitting the other rides because the water is warmer there!)

The Master Blaster

My daughter and her friends have claimed the Master Blaster as their favorite ride at Splash Mountain. It’s basically a water roller coaster, and the park’s first water slide to go uphill.

 The Ragin’ Raft

Things to Do in Ocean City Maryland: The Ragin' Raft Slide at Splash Mountain is the only four person slide in the area.

I don’t know how I ever let my Girl Scouts talk me into going on this ride, which is the only four person slide in the Ocean City area. (I have a severe fear of heights and this slide is pretty darn high. Couple that with the fact that I was riding with three young girls much smaller and lighter than me, and I thought I was going to catapult off the raft. Thankfully that was not the case and it was over fairly quickly.)

The Rapids

The Rapids water slide is the closest thing you’re going to get to riding down white water rapids in Ocean City, Maryland. Hang on as you hit bumps, curves, and ramps as you speed down the slide. I haven’t gotten up the nerve to try this one, but I think it sounds like a lot of fun.

The Splash Pad

Things to Do in Ocean City Maryland: The Splash Pad at Splash Mountain water park provides young children a safe place to play while their parents lounge nearby.

Another area for younger children, this shallow pool provides plenty of fun with fountains and waterfalls. Lounge chairs are conveniently located around the enclosed perimeter, giving mom and dad a chance to relax.

The Extras

In addition to the water park, the same complex also offers carnival-style rides, 2 miniature golf courses, and 10 go-kart racing tracks. You can buy your admission for just the water park, or combine it with admission to the other areas of the complex.

Tips for Making the Most of Your Visit

I thought I’d offer a few pointers from someone who has been to Splash Mountain several times.

  • Get there as close to 10:00 AM as possible. Yeah, that’s early, but the park fills up fast and you want to get the best chairs/table location possible. (Also, it’s a lot more fun when you feel like you have the place to yourself!)
  • Splash Mountain allows you to bring a cooler, so if you don’t want to pay for concessions on site, you don’t have to. Pack a lunch and some beverages and head on in.
  • If you think you might want to sample the food they offer, bring some cash with you as many food vendors only take cash, not credit/debit cards.
  • Lockers are available and conveniently located next to the rest rooms. I’ve never used them, but I think there is a fee to use them.
  • If it rains, you will not get a refund or rain check. The only time a rain check is issued is if the park decides to close due to extremely inclement weather. Even if you’re told to get out of the water while a thunderstorm rages all around you, you’re not getting a rain check.  My best advice is to wait out the weather. You can either sit under the umbrellas (they do not offer 100% protection from rain, however), or leave the park and come back. As long as you are still wearing your wristband, you are able to reenter the park the same day without paying additional admission costs.
Things to Do in Ocean City Maryland: A review of Splash Mountain water park.
New York City’s Interactive Spy Museum

New York City’s Interactive Spy Museum

Spyscape Review: Espionage in NYC

When Spyscape opened its doors in midtown Manhattan earlier this year, it was publicized as an interactive museum. Now, there are varying degrees of interactive, and in my experience, in most instances it means that you can push buttons on a video display. Happily, Spyscape is very different. From the moment you walk in you feel as if you have entered another world… the secretive world of covert operations and espionage. It’s not only interactive, it’s immersive. Read on for my Spyscape review.

Welcome to the World of Spies, Double Agents, and Hackers

From the minute you enter the building, you can’t help but feel like you’re about to go into a secret place. It’s sleek and modern, yet eerily quiet. (I arrived there shortly after opening. It might not be as quiet at other times of day.)

At the lobby welcome desk, you receive a ribbon wristband with a small cardboard tag on it. It’s more than just a cheap souvenir – it’s your ticket to unlocking some of the most interesting interactive features of the museum. But more on that later…

The museum has a free locker area, so you can stow any items you won’t need and retrieve them at the end of your visit. What a great feature! After we stashed our stuff, we headed to a really big (room-size) elevator that played a video as we ascended to the upper level of the museum. I honestly can’t tell you what they said in the video because I’ve forgotten, but it really set the stage for our entrance into the museum proper. We were so overcome by the creepy-cool ambiance that we were almost afraid to go to the rest rooms, located past the gift shop and down a long, empty corridor.

And speaking of the gift shop… it was really cool and sleek too.

Spyscape Review: Even the gift shop was sleek, modern, and secretive-looking.

Encryption

Spyscape Review: The Encryption area of the museum explored ways to encode (and decode) messages.

The first area of the museum we explored was the Encryption area. We got to see the costumes that Benedict Cumberbatch and Keira Knightley wore in The Imitation Game, a movie about Alan Turing’s efforts to crack Nazi codes during Word War II.  Among the other displays relating to the movie was an actual Enigma machine:

Spyscape Review: The Enigma section of the spy museum included an actual Enigma machine from World War II.

We also had a few encryption exercises at a large illuminated table. We were given a statement in code that we had to decipher, and then a response that we had to put into code. At the time, I didn’t realize that there were actually several different tasks, so I only completed the first one and then moved on.

The encryption area led into a corridor that examined the life and espionage activities of double agent Robert Hanssen, who worked for the FBI and the KGB simultaneously over a period of 22 years.

Spyscape Review: Robert Hanssen was a double agent of the KGB and FBI for 22 years before he was caught.

Hanssen’s story made for the perfect segue into the next section:

Deception

Here we learned the nuances of lying. We learned about body language and certain “tells” that might indicate someone was not speaking the truth. Touching the nose, looking up and to the side, pursing their lips, and other subtle clues can help you discern if someone is telling the truth. But the question is, how observant are you?

Time to put our new knowledge to the test! We went into small dark booths, and watched short videos of people making statements. We decided whether they were telling the truth or lying. Happy to say that I aced this one with a perfect score!

Surveillance

Our next stop was the Surveillance room, a huge circular area surrounded by video screens. Visitors wore special head sets and were prompted to answer questions about people and activities on the screens. It was surreal, standing in that area and spinning around to look for specific details. I decided I definitely do not want to work as a security guard, ever.

Spyscape review: The Surveillance Room tests how quickly you can make observations from camera monitors.

We saw a lot of Edward Snowden items in this room. My daughter didn’t know who he was (she was 11 when he became a household name), so I filled her in on the basics and we watched the Snowden movie a month or so later. What followed were some thought-provoking discussions about personal privacy and government surveillance of its citizens.

Spyscape Review: Edward Snowden-related items were on display in the Surveillance room.

Special Ops

The next area was one that got our blood pumping. In Special Ops, we individually entered another small dark room. This one had light up discs from floor to ceiling on both walls, and green lasers criss-crossed paths from one side to the other. The object was to turn off as many of the discs as possible without bumping into one of the laser beams. It was surprisingly difficult! Here’s my daughter in action – I was watching on the monitor outside the rooms.

After the lasers were turned off, you had your second test, which was turning off as many discs as you could in a set period of time. Again, more challenging than you might think!

Hacking

In this day and age, espionage and technology go hand in hand. So naturally, hacking and cyber-security were a component of Spyscape. According to one exhibit in this section, the development of a computer virus called Stuxnet to attack Iran’s nuclear weapons program in 2005 was the beginning of the cyber warfare era.

Spyscape Review: This infograph implies that Stuxnet opened the Pandora's box of cyber warfare which we continue to battle today.
Stuxnet opened a Pandora’s box of computer hacking that continues to evolve even today. There are white hat hackers, who look for weaknesses in computer systems so they can be fixed, and black hat hackers, who look for weaknesses in order to exploit them.

A display case of smirking Guy Fawkes masks worn by the hacking group Anonymous was an eerie reminder of how many people are actively working to hack into computer systems around the world.

Spyscape Review: Anonymous' Guy Fawkes masks, some of which were signed by hackers in the infamous group.

Testing Stations

This was not a specific room or exhibit of the museum. Throughout the building, visitors can test their skills in three areas: personality, brain power, and risk. All we had to do was step up to any kiosk and wave our wristband in front of the reader. Once it registered who we were, our name appeared on the screen and we could choose which assessment to take.

Spyscape Review: Visitors receive personalized test results.

Debrief

A former Head of Training at British Intelligence helped develop Spyscape’s profiling system, which takes the results of your activities and compiles them. From those results, it chooses your most likely espionage-related career.

My Spyscape Review

Our adventure at Spyscape was nothing short of fantastic! We had so much fun, and I couldn’t help but notice that it really could appeal to many groups. Since I’m a history geek, I found the evolution of espionage fascinating. Kids of any age will love the interactive, high tech elements. Even the two teenagers I traveled with (one of whom is staunchly anti-museum) loved it there.

My final word is that Spyscape is a great attraction for families who want to do something that everyone will enjoy. That’s quite a rarity, so be sure to check it out the next time you’re in New York City!

NB: This is not a sponsored post; I received no compensation. All of the opinions expressed above are my own.

Spyscape Review: Travelasmuch.com's review of Spyscape, the new spy museum in New York City
Ocean City Maryland’s Best Boardwalk Food

Ocean City Maryland’s Best Boardwalk Food

A Summer Tradition

Having grown up on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, I have gone to Ocean City in the summertime as long as I can remember. There are so many great things to do there, from swimming and sunbathing to “walking the boards” and sampling all of the delicious foods sold along the boardwalk. Some of my favorites include chocolate covered strawberries from Candy Kitchen, Dolle’s salt water taffy, Dough Roller pizza, and caramel popcorn from Fisher’s. They’re all outstanding! But only one treat can claim the title of Ocean City Maryland’s Best Boardwalk Food – Thrashers french fries.

About Thrashers

The story of these tasty fries begins in 1929, when J.T. Thrasher proposed a unique business concept for the seaside community. He wanted to have a food stand that sold one product, and one product only: the French fry. With just one product for sale, he had to excel. Only the best would do.

Thrasher focused on three things: quality ingredients, hard work, and above all, attention to the perfection of each cup of fries. He discovered that the perfect French fries had to come from perfect potatoes, which meant buying potatoes from different regions at different times of the year.

I’ve heard many rumors about why Thrasher’s fries are so much better than others. Does Thrasher’s brine their potatos before frying? Do they fry in peanut oil? Do they fry their potatoes twice instead of just once? Speculation abounds!  Whatever their secret (and it is very much a secret!), Thrasher’s fries have been a local favorite through five generations and eighty years. And all that time without any deviation from original procedures or original recipes!

Get Your Fries & Eat ‘Em Right

Now, fair warning: in the height of the summer season, you may have to wait in a considerable line when you go to Thrasher’s. I’ve actually seen as many as 20 or 30 people in a line for these famous fries. In fact, if you happen to be walking past and by some miracle there is no line, go ahead and get some fries just on general principle.

When you get up to the counter, you can order one of three sizes  (16 oz, 32 oz and 53 oz). Yes, that’s right: the smallest serving you can buy is a pound. Regardless what size you order, you will receive your fries in a paper tub.

Ocean City Maryland's Best Boardwalk Food - Thrasher's French Fries

When you are handed your fries, do not make the mistake of asking for ketchup. They don’t have ketchup at Thrasher’s and they probably never will. These fries are not meant to be eaten with ketchup.

Instead, should you desire a condiment, you will find apple cider vinegar at the end of the counter. Sprinkle or pour it on, depending how much you like vinegar. Then maybe add some extra salt if you like salty fries.

Now you are ready to dig in to this golden delicious goodness:

Ocean City Maryland's Best Boardwalk Food - Thrasher's French Fries

If you’ve never had boardwalk style fries before, you may think that some of them are burnt because of the dark brown coloring. They are not. Some will be as crispy as a potato chip and others (particularly if you were heavy handed with the vinegar) will be almost soggy. But they will all be delicious.

Leftovers?

If your eyes are bigger than your stomach and you ordered way more fries than you can eat, don’t worry.  These guys love Thrasher’s almost as much as the locals do.

Ocean City Maryland's Best Boardwalk Food - Thrasher's French Fries. Even the seagulls love them!

That swarm of seagulls is fairly typical when you’re holding a tub of Thrasher’s. One time my husband and I had just gotten a tub of fries when a seagull swooped by, plucking a French fry right out of Hubs’ hand!  Thankfully, most of the seagulls are not that bold. If you don’t feed them, they will eventually lose interest and fly away.

Have you had Thrasher’s fries before? What did you think of them? Let me know below!

Header image via Flickr by m01229

Ocean City Maryland's Best Boardwalk Food
Surprise! A Dozen Amazing Things to Do in Baltimore MD

Surprise! A Dozen Amazing Things to Do in Baltimore MD

Things to Do in Baltimore MD

For decades, Baltimore has been seen as the ugly stepsister to Washington DC’s Cinderella. Many people consider it less attractive, less popular, and less interesting, with less to offer tourists. In the mid-1970s, then Mayor William Donald Schaefer wanted to come up with a catchy name or slogan to help improve the city’s image. Advertising executives met to discuss the idea and one of them came up with the following statement:

Baltimore has more history and unspoiled charm tucked away in quiet corners than most American cities out in the spotlight.

From there, the city’s nickname – Charm City – was born. The advertising campaign fizzled out not long after it was started, but the name stuck. Today you will still hear people refer to Baltimore as Charm City. While it might seem like a misnomer, there are dozens of great things to do in Baltimore MD. Here are a few of my favorites.

Catch an Orioles Game (April-September)

Fans of the Baltimore Orioles are a die hard bunch. The team hasn’t won a World Series since 1983, but hope springs eternal in Charm City. Of course, it doesn’t hurt that the stadium (Oriole Park at Camden Yards) is one of the most beautiful in the country.

Things to Do in Baltimore MD - Catch a game at Oriole Park at Camden Yards

Built about 25 years ago, Camden Yards was the first “retro” design stadium. Before that, major league stadiums were symmetrical multi-purpose stadiums used for both baseball and football. Now, roughly two thirds of the major league baseball teams have followed suit, and built retro parks. The great thing about watching a baseball game at Camden Yards is that there really aren’t any bad seats. You’ll have a great view of the action no matter where you are.

Visit Not One, but TWO Free Art Museums

There are two top-notch art museums in Baltimore, and both have free admission.  The Baltimore Museum of Art (BMA) is home to an internationally renowned collection of art that ranges from ancient Antioch mosaics to cutting-edge contemporary art. The BMA has over 95,000 works of art, including the largest public holding of works by Henri Matisse.

Things to do in Baltimore MD - The Baltimore Museum of Art and the Walters Art Museum both have outstanding collections and offer free admission.
The Baltimore Museum of Art features the work of many famous artists, like Edgar Degas’ Little Dancer, Aged Fourteen. The Walters has a priceless collection of art from many countries and time periods, including this beautiful Faberge egg.

The collection of works at the Walters Art Museum includes masterworks of ancient Egypt, Greek sculpture and Roman sarcophagi, medieval ivories, illuminated manuscripts, Renaissance bronzes, Old Master European and 19th-century paintings, Chinese ceramics and bronzes, Art Deco jewelry (including Tiffany & Lalique), and ancient Near East, Mesopotamian, or ancient Middle East items.

Mt Vernon Neighborhood

While at the Walters, spend some time exploring the neighborhood outside, which is known as Mt Vernon. Designated a National Historic Landmark District and a city Cultural District, it is one of the city’s oldest neighborhoods and originally was home to Baltimore’s most wealthy and fashionable families.

Architecture enthusiasts in particular will enjoy strolling through the area. It’s not uncommon to find houses that date back a century or even two. Mount Vernon boasts examples of many different types of period architecture: Federal, Greek Revival, Italianate, Gothic Revival, Second Empire, Queen Anne, Romanesque, Chateau, Renaissance Revival, Beaux-Arts and Classical Revival.

The Washington Monument – Yes, in Baltimore!

While you’re walking around Mt Vernon, check out the original Washington Monument, which is the first U.S. heroic and civic monument dedicated to George Washington. It predates the one in Washington DC by over 30 years.

Things to do in Baltimore MD - visit the original Washington Monument, built 30+ years before the one in DC

You can climb the Monument’s 227 marble steps for a great view of the city. Open Wed.-Sun. The Monument’s gallery with interactive exhibits is free; the climb to the top $6 for adults, $4 for children.

Peabody Library

Also in the Mt Vernon area, the George Peabody Library is a must see for bibliophiles. The library’s collection dates from the founding of the Peabody Institute in 1857. In that year, George Peabody, a Massachusetts-born philanthropist, dedicated the Peabody Institute to the citizens of Baltimore in appreciation of their “kindness and hospitality.”

Things to Do in Baltimore MD - the gorgeous George Peabody Library.

The library contains five floors of ornamental cast-iron balconies, which rise dramatically to the skylight 61 feet above the floor. It houses 300,000 volumes, mainly from the 19th century, with strengths in religion, British art, architecture, topography and history; American history, biography, and literature; Romance languages and literature; history of science; and geography, exploration, and travel.

It’s such a beautiful building that it also serves as a venue for weddings and private events.

Eat in Little Italy

Baltimore’s Little Italy is an old quaint Italian neighborhood in Baltimore City that has survived and thrived for several generations. Its original residents emigrated from Italy from the mid-1800s into the early 1900s. By 1920 the neighborhood was 100% Italian. It boasts century-old row homes, family-run restaurants, bocce courts, cultural learning center, Sons of Italy lodge, and much more. Lovingly nicknamed ‘The Neighborhood,’ Little Italy is a tight-knit Italian community that today includes residents of other ethnic backgrounds as well. Have dinner at a great restaurant like Amicci’s, but don’t get too full.  You’ll want to be sure to stop by Vaccaro’s Italian Pastry Shop for dessert!

Fort McHenry

Fort McHenry was the focus of the Battle of Baltimore in the War of 1812. Over a 27 hour period, the British fired 1,500 to 1,800 cannonballs at the fort. What’s worse, they did so from just outside the range of the fort’s cannons, so they could not be bombarded in return.

On the morning of September 14, 1814, the regular flag at Fort McHenry was replaced with a larger flag, signaling American victory over the British. The sight inspired Francis Scott Key to write the poem “Defence of Fort M’Henry.” Later, the poem was set to music and become known as the “Star Spangled Banner,” the national anthem of the United States.

Things to Do in Baltimore MD - Fort McHenry, where Francis Scott Key wrote our national anthem.

Every September, the City of Baltimore celebrates Defenders Day in honor of the Battle of Baltimore. It is the biggest celebration of the year at the Fort, with programs, events, and spectacular fireworks. But Fort McHenry is worth visiting at any time of year for its historical reenactments, exhibits about the War of 1812, and more.

The Inner Harbor

Baltimore’s Inner Harbor is a hub of activity. In just a few city blocks, you can unearth dinosaurs at the Maryland Science Center, get a history lesson at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture, pay respects to pop culture at Geppi’s Entertainment Museum, or submerge yourself in exotic sea life at the National Aquarium. Other attractions include the American Visionary Art Museum, the Babe Ruth Museum, and the Port Discovery Children’s Museum.

Things to Do in Baltimore MD - The Inner Harbor is full of unique and interesting opportunities for visitors to Charm City.

Baltimore’s Inner Harbor has loads of restaurants, pubs, hotels and shops. The Water Taxi will take you from the harbor to surrounding neighborhoods, and the free Charm City Circulator provides daily bus service through several downtown routes.

Visit the National Aquarium

The National Aquarium was the crowning achievement in Baltimore’s urban renewal during the 1980s. Today, some thirty-five or so years later, it still is a favorite attraction for crowds of all ages. The National Aquarium houses several exhibits including the Upland Tropical Rain Forest, a multiple-story Atlantic Coral Reef, an open ocean shark tank, and Australia: Wild Extremes, which won the “Best Exhibit” award from the Association of Zoos and Aquariums in 2008.

Things to Do in Baltimore MD - check out the National Aquarium at the Inner Harbor for a full day of fun.

The aquarium also has a 4D Immersion Theater and a marine mammal pavilion, which holds seven Atlantic bottlenose dolphins.

The National Aquarium has timed admission, so it’s wise to purchase your tickets in advance rather than at the door.

Maryland Science Center

Located not too far from the Aquarium, the Maryland Science Center was another establishment that brought tourism to the Inner Harbor area. It includes three levels of exhibits, a planetarium, an IMAX theater, and an observatory. Definitely worth a visit if you’re traveling with school aged children.

Things to Do in Baltimore MD - the Maryland Science Center is a must-see for families with school age children.

The modernized hands-on exhibits include more than two dozen dinosaur skeletons, as well as physical science, space, Earth science, the human body, and blue crabs, which are native to the Chesapeake Bay.

And Speaking of Crabs…

No list of things to do in Baltimore (or most of Maryland, truth be told) would be complete without the mention of steamed blue crabs. Served with generous helpings of Old Bay seasoning, this crustacean is a tasty treat. Pick your own or, if you prefer to keep your hands clean, order a delicious crab cake. If you go to Baltimore and don’t eat crabs, that’s akin to visiting Chicago and not eating deep dish pizza, or going to Philadelphia and not getting a cheese steak. ‘Nuff said.

Things to Do in Baltimore MD - Local cuisine features steamed crabs with Old Bay seasoning

So, when traveling in the mid-Atlantic region, don’t overlook Charm City. It’s a great destination!

Things to Do in Baltimore MD on Travelasmuch.com
Washington DC’s Best Pubs

Washington DC’s Best Pubs

Drum roll, please!

These are the best pubs in Washington, DC.  And as luck would have it, there are exactly seven… so you can try one each night for a week!

The seven best pubs in Washington DC
The seven best pubs in Washington DC
The Ultimate US Road Trip: Blue Ridge Parkway

The Ultimate US Road Trip: Blue Ridge Parkway

A Tale of Two Travelers…

For Thanksgiving this year, we decided to head out of town for a break. Our destination was Pigeon Forge/Gatlinburg, Tennessee. If we had ridden solely on interstate highways, we could have arrived there in ten hours. That’s my preferred way to drive. The quicker you can reach your destination, the better – that way you have more time to go places and see things and do stuff.

Road trip Blue Ridge Parkway so you have a better view than this.
My usual view as we travel along the Interstate.

Hubs, however, is my polar opposite when it comes to driving. He can’t stand driving on big highways and prefers long, circuitous, and scenic drives instead. He had been on the Blue Ridge Parkway earlier this year with his motorcycling friends and insisted that we drive at least part of the way to Tennessee on the Blue Ridge Parkway.

We knocked out about four hours of the drive the very first night and got a hotel room in Charlottesville, Virginia. As we were discussing what time we wanted to get up in the morning, my husband said to me, “Well, we need to get up early. We have 12 hours of driving to do tomorrow.”

I just about had to pick my jaw up off the floor. I was thinking that with six hours left to travel via interstates, his route would take us eight or nine hours at most. But twelve?!?!? I was so flabbergasted I could not even speak. When I recovered my ability to form sentences again, I calmly informed him that being in the car for 12 hours was neither practical nor desirable.

Fortunately, he revised his plans and pared down our road trip on the Blue Ridge Parkway to a 50 mile stretch. I was quite relieved.

But First, History!

I am nothing if not a history geek. Please bear with me…

The Blue Ridge Parkway is 469 miles long, running through the Blue Ridge mountains of Virginia and North Carolina. (If you’ve never heard of the Blue Ridge Mountains, it’s helpful to know that they are a section of the Appalachian Mountains.) The parkway runs from Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina to the Shenandoah National Park in Virginia. The parkway actually continues on through Shenandoah for an additional 105 miles, but the name becomes Skyline Drive.

The original name for the route was the Appalachian Scenic Highway, and it was begun as a project in Franklin D Roosevelt’s New Deal. During World War II, conscientious objectors serving in the Civilian Service Program worked on the project.

Over 50 years passed before the construction of the parkway came to an end. The route has:

  • 26 tunnels constructed through the rock (1 in Virginia, 25 in North Carolina)
  • Six viaducts
  • 168 bridges
  • Elevation of 6,053 feet at its highest point (Richland Balsam – Mile Post 431)
  • No tolls/fees for usage

Our Drive

Even though I was reluctant to go from 70 mph on the interstate to 45 mph on the parkway, once we got on the parkway and started driving, I kinda fell in love with the scenery.  The roads were a bit twisty and 45 was probably the safest speed at which to travel. Some of the trees still had leaves, but most were bare.  I couldn’t help but imagine how gorgeous it must be in peak autumn foliage season (mid to late October, depending on the elevation).

Our first stop to pull over and admire the scenery was a rocky overlook with a couple of big boulders and a view of the valley below.

Road Trip on the Blue Ridge Parkway - there are many opportunities to stop and admire the scenery.

As I looked out at the patches of green fields and the blue-purple mountains, I realized this was waaayyy better than anything I could have seen on the interstate.

If you look at this shot, you might notice a spot of blue just below and to the right of the center.  That’s a river running through the valley.

Beautiful scenery abounds on a road trip through the Blue Ridge Parkway

We drove along through the Peaks of Otter, where my husband stopped on his previous trip through the area.  (Fun fact: you can get one of those oval shaped abbreviation stickers here. It says POO for Peaks of Otter.  He totally got one the last time he was there.) We didn’t stop at Peaks of Otter, but I would be remiss if I didn’t mention that there is a lodge right there, with mountains behind it and a lake in front of it.  What a gorgeous setting!

We stopped a little farther along at another overlook. This one reminded me of Yorkshire, with the patchwork of fields decorating the valley.

Stopping at scenic overlooks while on a road trip through the Blue Ridge Parkway will provide you with many beautiful vistas.

We even got to see a dam!

Taking a road trip on the Blue Ridge Parkway will provide you with many interesting sights, like this dam.

If you’re traveling north or south between Virginia and North Carolina and/or visiting either the Great Smoky Mountain National Park or Shenandoah National Park, I highly recommend taking the Blue Ridge Parkway, even if only part of the way. The views were breathtaking, the weather was gorgeous, and it was a much nicer drive than I-81!

 

Traveling through Virginia and/or North Carolina? Visiting the Great Smoky Mountains and/or Shenandoah national parks? The Blue Ridge parkway is a great road trip, showing off some of the Appalachian Mountains' most beautiful scenery.
Virginia’s Eastern Shore, Part II – Cape Charles

Virginia’s Eastern Shore, Part II – Cape Charles

Part I of this post focused on the culinary festivals that take place on Virginia’s Eastern Shore, particularly oyster roasts in the fall.  To read that post, click here.

Virginia’s Eastern Shore – Cape Charles

Day two of our expedition to Virginia’s Eastern Shore took us way south to Cape Charles. It’s a small town (population of about 1000) situated on the western side of the peninsula, with beachfront along the Chesapeake Bay.

Driving on Virginia’s Eastern Shore is stress free and easy.  Basically, there’s one highway (US-13) that runs the length of it, north to south. The Virginia end of the peninsula is 70 miles long but only  5-12 miles wide.   So we ambled in to Port Charles, turning off of Route 13 and heading toward the beach.

Along the way we passed lots of small independent stores.  I was just itching to go shopping but Hubs wanted to see the bay first.  We got to the beach and found this great sculpture waiting for us:

Virginia's Eastern Shore - Cape Charles. This LOVE sign represents the community and greets visitors to the beach.

In a state whose tourism motto is “Virginia is for Lovers,” this LOVE sign adds a unique twist because it represents Cape Charles specifically. The L is made of sea glass and seashells to represent the local community. The O is a tractor tire to represent agriculture. The V is made of kayaks to represent outdoor adventure activities and the E is made of crab pots to represent aquaculture.

Just past the sign, we saw the weathered wood of a fishing pier zigzagging out into the Chesapeake Bay.

Virginia's Eastern Shore Cape Charles public fishing pier at the beach

But before heading out to the pier, we took a quick stroll along the beach. It is truly a blessing to live on the Delmarva Peninsula because we have two very different types of coastal beaches.  First is the Atlantic to the east  with its crashing waves and the roar of the surf.  It’s beautiful and intimidating all at once. Then there’s “the bay side” which is the coastline along the Chesapeake Bay. The water there is calmer, warmer, and very different.  What struck me was how clear and calm the water along the Cape Charles beach appeared.

Virginia's Eastern Shore - Cape Charles' public beach faces the Chesapeake Bay and has much calmer water.

We walked the beach a little, then headed out to the end of the fishing pier.  We saw a couple of freighter ships in the distance, and a group of a half-dozen or so pelicans closer than that.  Seeing the pelicans was a surprise – I have never seen any outside a zoo and did not even know that they lived in this area!

We left the beach and headed back up Mason Avenue, which is the main street in town. There are several shops, an art gallery, a gourmet market, and a couple of restaurants.

Virginia's Eastern Shore - Cape Charles' Mason Avenue

Our first stop was a little shop called The Boardwalk, which was full of beach-themed decor items, gifts, and jewelry.  I saw SO MANY cute and/or awesome things! I probably could have done at least half of my Christmas shopping there if I’d had enough time. This pillow was one of my (many) favorites:

Virginia's Eastern Shore - Cape Charles shop The Boardwalk offers beach theme gifts and decor.

Another store, which was closed at the time of our visit, had these amazing nautilus shell and stained glass creations in its window:

Virginia's Eastern Shore Cape Charles has a thriving art community.

I did a little shopping, and then it was time to head to lunch.  So we drove on over to The Oyster Farm Seafood Eatery.

Virginia's Eastern Shore - in Cape Charles, the Oyster Farm Seafood Eatery offers waterfront dining and fresh seafood.

My husband ordered a clam basket and I ordered a crab cake sandwich.  It was an unseasonably warm day for November, so we got to dine on the deck, and that was a real treat.  The menu offered a variety of seafood items.  When we asked if the clams and oysters were local, our server said yes, and pointed out that we could actually see the clam beds from where we sat on the back deck of the restaurant.

Virginia's Eastern Shore - Cape Charles' Oyster Farm Seafood Eatery has seafood so fresh, you can see the clam beds from the restaurant.
(The dark stripes just beyond the rocks are the clam beds.)

After lunch, I was craving something sweet.  Ice cream, to be specific.  A Google search for ice cream in Cape Charles provided me with the name and address of Brown Dog Ice Cream.  We went over there but found it closed until spring.  A visit to their web site suggested we purchase some of their ice cream at Gull Hummock, a gourmet market about one block down from their shop.  The Gull Hummock had some very interesting and unusual flavors of Brown Dog, but ultimately we stuck with something basic – chocolate.

Virginia's Eastern Shore - Cape Charles' Brown Dog Handmade Ice Ceam

It was smooth and creamy and quite delicious! We took the pint to go with two spoons.

While we were enjoying our ice cream, and before heading to our next destination, we drove around the town a little to see what we could find.  Imagine our surprise when this sight came into view:

Virginia's Eastern Shore - Cape Charles is an area where cotton is grown.

In the background, the Cape Charles lighthouse.  But in the foreground – are those what I think they are?  We went closer.

Cotton plants on Virginia's Eastern Shore (Cape Charles)

Cotton plants!  Something I only associated with “the deep South” but was right next door on Virginia’s Eastern Shore.  I was out of my cotton-pickin’ mind to think it couldn’t grow here.  (Hahahaha, see what I did there?)

Part III of my adventure on Virginia’s Eastern Shore will feature kayaking and a wine tasting.  Stay tuned!

 

 

Virginia's Eastern Shore - Cape Charles is a tiny town with a lot to offer visitors!

 

Virginia’s Eastern Shore, Part I – Culinary Festivals

Virginia’s Eastern Shore, Part I – Culinary Festivals

Virginia’s Eastern Shore: Culinary Festivals?

The Eastern Shore of Virginia is probably not the first place that comes to mind as a culinary destination, even for Delmarva locals. However, if you drive to the southern end of our peninsula, you will find an area that is brimming with opportunities for foodies to enjoy. Eastern Shore of Virginia Tourism arranged for me to spend a weekend wining and dining there.  I was pleasantly surprised at how much there was to do!

The Island House Oyster Roast

We received tickets to the Island House Oyster Roast, an annual event held in Wachapreague, Virginia, to benefit the Navy Seal Foundation.  This was the Oyster Roast’s sixth year, and from what I could gather, it is something that the locals really look forward to.  In fact, tickets to the event sold out in advance! It’s the first of at least six oyster roasts on Virginia’s Eastern Shore just in the month of November.

The Island House is a waterfront restaurant, and the Oyster Roast is held on its grounds/in its parking lot.  When we arrived, the first thing we noticed was the massive roasting operation taking place to the side.

The men dump a hundred or two oysters onto a big metal tray and spread them out over a fire. Then they take a burlap sack that has soaked in water and lay it on top of the oysters.  The water and the fire combine to steam cook the oysters.  When the shells start to open, they’re done. Then the guys dump them into a basket and carry them to the oyster-eating tables nearby:

virginia's eastern shore culinary festivalsisland house oyster roast wachapreague

Yeah.  Eating oysters can be kind of messy.  But the Oyster Roast had more than just roasted oysters.  Guests had the options of raw oysters, clams, and pulled pork as well.

virginia's eastern shore culinary festivals island house oyster roast clams

It was delicious!  And although the food was a big draw, there were other great aspects of this culinary festival.

First, the proceeds go to the Navy Seal Foundation.  The foundation provides “a comprehensive set of programs specifically designed to improve health and welfare, build and enhance resiliency, empower and educate families and provide critical support during times of illness, injury, loss and transition.” At one point in the evening, the widow of a Navy Seal took the stage. She spoke about the day that officers came to her door to notify her that her husband had been killed in action. Her appeal for the support of these brave men and their families was touching.

Second, and on a much lighter note, was the music! A band called The Deloreans played and they were so much fun to listen to! They played nothing but music from the 1980s, with all of the costumes and accessories to take you back in time to that wonderful decade.  They played Prince, Cyndi Lauper, Twisted Sister, Billy Idol, Michael Jackson, and so many others.  If you live in or visit the Virginia Beach area and they’re playing, go see them – they are the best!

virginia's eastern shore culinary festivals island house oyster roast wachapreague deloreans bank 80s music

In addition to the tickets that raised money for the foundation, there were some live and silent auction items also.  There were stunning art photographs, hand carved decoys, jewelry, and more.

virginia's eastern shore culinary festivals island house oyster roast wachapreague auction items benefit navy seal foundation

But my favorite had to be this jaw-dropping fire pit:

virginia's eastern shore culinary festivals island house oyster roast wachapreague mine fire pit

All in all, it was a great evening, with good food, good music, and a good cause.  What more could you ask for?

How about a good night’s sleep?

The Inn at Onancock

When we left the oyster roast, we made our obligatory stop at Walmart to buy the necessities that I had forgotten to pack.  It a eems like there is always something that doesn’t make it into my bag.  Thank goodness for Walmart and Dollar Tree! Then we were off to our overnight lodging at the Inn at Onancock.

The Inn at Onancock’s slogan is “Arrive as Guests, Leave as Friends.” I would have thought that kind of hokey if it weren’t for the fact that we met a couple at breakfast who said they have stayed at the inn several times and always come back because they feel so welcomed there. Some extenuating circumstances prevented us from getting to interact much with the innkeepers. A family emergency had called Kim away, so we only met Matt, who was very friendly and hospitable.

virginia's eastern shore culinary festivals

The rooms are gorgeously appointed in different themes (Provence, Tuscany, Far East, etc.).  We stayed in the Far East room and found the bed very comfortable. That may not sound like much, but I am like the Princess and the Pea when it comes to sleeping in a strange bed. It isn’t very often that I can say another bed was comfortable.

The innkeepers anticipated any need that their guests might have.  The hallway outside the guest rooms contained a mini fridge stocked with cold beverages, and a Keurig coffee station. In the morning, the innkeepers set up a tray outside our door with our morning beverages of choice (coffee for Hubs and diet Coke for me). I cannot over-emphasize how much I appreciated the opportunity to get some caffeine in my system before I had to go downstairs and make small talk with strangers over breakfast.  Life saver.

We missed it because we were at the oyster roast, but every evening at the Inn, they have a “Wine Down” hour – an opportunity for guests to socialize and enjoy a glass of wine together. The inn’s breakfast is delicious and filling, with a variety of delicious foods.

The inn has received rave reviews and awards, which were proudly displayed in the foyer. My only (minor) complaint about the accommodation was that the walls seemed very thin and we heard a lot of noises.  I would recommend using either earplugs or a white noise machine to help keep it quiet while you rest.

The Island House Oyster Roast takes place at the Island House restaurant in Wachapreague, Virginia every year. If you’re thinking about going, try to get your tickets early as they do tend to sell out.  Also, tickets are only available for sale at the Island House, so you will need to visit the restaurant in person to purchase them.

The Inn at Onancock is open year-round, with a total of five bedrooms with private baths.  One of the rooms (The Maine Room) is pet-friendly, so that’s the one to book if you are traveling with four-legged family members.

The Eastern Shore of Virginia Tourism bureau provided me with tickets to the event and our accommodations. However, all opinions expressed here are my own.

For Part II of our weekend adventure on Virginia’s Eastern Shore, click here.

virginia's eastern shore culinary festivals