Tag: virginia

Beachcomber’s Paradise: Metompkin Island, Virginia

Beachcomber’s Paradise: Metompkin Island, Virginia

You Want to Do What?

I’ll be honest, when my husband told me that he wanted me to join him on a long canoe ride the Saturday before Thanksgiving, I was not too excited.  Canoeing is definitely not my kind of fun. Faced with unseasonably warm weather and a promise that I would enjoy it, I begrudgingly agreed.  We began our Saturday morning with a very long drive to the Eastern Shore of Virginia.

The Eastern Shore of Virginia is the third and southernmost part of the Delmarva Peninsula (Del=Delaware, Mar=Maryland, Va=Virginia). The Delmarva Peninsula has the Atlantic Ocean to its east and the Chesapeake Bay to its west.  The Virginia portion of the peninsula is so isolated from the rest of its state that I’ve often wondered if its residents feel like everyone else who calls the state home doesn’t even know they exist.

metompkin island map best seashell beaches
The Eastern Shore of Virginia – everything south of the gray dashed line.

You Want to Go Where?

We drove and drove until we reached an area called Gargatha. There is a public boat ramp at the end of Gargatha Landing Road, and that’s where the water leg of our journey would begin. It would end on Metompkin Island, which I had never heard of before.

metompkin-island-map-zoomed-in best seashell beaches
This map is the zoomed in version of the one above.  In both cases, the red pin marks Metompkin Island – our destination.

So… this is fun?

We got the canoe in the water and headed out.  The wind was blowing against us, which is pretty much my worst nightmare when I’m in a canoe.  You have to paddle twice as hard to cover the same distance in the same time.  Basically, for every two strokes, we were only advancing one. Adding to the difficulty was the fact that we kept getting pushed off course.

At one point, we ended up stuck in some tall grasses. We were so tired and frustrated that we decided to just sit there, eat our sandwiches that we had brought with us, and rest for a few minutes. Then it was time to paddle some more. We hadn’t gone much farther when I saw this:

metompkin-island-danger-sign best seashell beaches

This was most definitely not what I wanted to see, especially since there were no details offered. What danger? Dangerous for whom? Hubs assured me that it was for larger boats, not canoes or kayaks. Apparently the water isn’t very deep there.

I could hear a very loud but distant noise and we seemed to be moving toward it. It turned out to be the ocean, which meant we were close! I was so relieved to see the beach ahead of us! We pulled our canoe up on the land and went out to explore.

Surprise! It was worth going after all.

I couldn’t believe how many shells there were – the beach was absolutely littered with them!  It has to be one of the best seashell beaches in the mid-Atlantic, and certainly the best I had ever been on!

best seashell beaches metompkin island virginia

I told Hubs that I hoped I would find a piece of sea glass while we were there. Three steps later, I found myself looking at a spot of cobalt blue off to my left. It was roughly 2 inches square, part of an old glass Milk of Magnesia bottle.

Sadly, I didn’t find any other pieces of sea glass that day.  However, I hit the jackpot when it came to seashells, as you might have guessed. There were clam shells, oyster shells, whelk shells (at least two kinds), periwinkles, scallops, limpet shells, cockle shells, and sea snail shells. I also found some non-shell items like a mermaid’s purse and a whelk egg case.

Fortunately, Hubs thought to bring one of my extra big Thirty-one utility tote bags, because when I got out to the water I was running all over the place and picking up shells like a kid who had (a) never seen a beach and (b) had consumed a week’s worth of sugar. “Oooooohhh, look at this one,”  I’d yell, and hold it out for him to see. I wouldn’t even wait for a reaction before I’d start looking for more.

There were really big shells:

metompkin-island-big-shell best seashell beaches
Women’s size 9 flip flop shown for scale.

And there were tiny little ones:

metompkin-island-tiny-shell best seashell beaches

For some reason, I always said “Awwwww!” whenever I found a tiny one. Like it was a puppy or something.

After just an hour of combing the beach and gathering cool shells, our bag was full – and heavy:

metompkin island bag of shells best seashell beaches

We left it at the canoe and headed off in the opposite direction, determined to not pick up any more shells.

Well, that resolve faded faster than most New Year’s diets! By the time we spent another hour on the beach, all of our pockets were full, we were carrying some in our arms, and we had even filled an empty tortilla chip bag full of shells.  Clearly, it was time to leave. If we had stayed longer, we might not have had room in the canoe for us!

Yeah. It’s a little addictive.

I cleaned, dried, and sorted all of my new shells after I got home. Curious, I decided to count them too. I picked up close to 300 shells! Now, all I have to do is figure out what to do with them.  🙂

Not that a lack of ideas will keep me from going back. It’s at the top of my list for things to do once it gets warm again.

Metompkin Island is part of a 60 mile chain of barrier islands on Virginia’s Eastern Shore. Some of the islands are not public lands, and regulations prohibit certain activities on the public ones. Check before you go.

A Trip to Bikini Bottom

A Trip to Bikini Bottom

Hubs and I went for a boat ride yesterday. We started from the small town of Greenbackville, Virgina, near the Maryland/Virginia border on the Eastern Shore. We motored around Chincoteague Bay for a couple of hours and once the boat was safely back on the trailer, we headed to the local eatery, which was conveniently located right next to the boat ramp.


Now, the sign is a little weathered and from the outside, the place doesn’t look like much. But The Crusty Crab Seafood Shack is a real treat.

The inside is decorated with an eclectic mixture of SpongeBob paraphernalia, pirate decor, and beautifully painted sea life.


There is a small dining area when you walk in, but just beyond that on the far end of the building is a larger, screened in  porch set up with tables and chairs. Lighting is provided by lamps made from peck baskets, a cool breeze is stirred up by some ceiling fans, and seashell wind chimes hang from the ceiling.


The view is amazing.

A visit to the one-toilet, unisex bathroom is, oddly enough, pretty entertaining. There is a LOT to look at in there. After a minute of taking it all, you turn to lift the lid on the toilet, and you see this:


As you are doing your business, take a look up. A shelf of coconut heads is staring down at you.


Then look even farther up, at the ceiling.


The back of the door is similarly decorated.


There’s a lot of poop humor in the bathroom.


But back to the dining room.  Each table has a basket with condiments and utensils.


Malt vinegar may seem like a strange thing to put on every table, but it’s the perfect complement to the boardwalk style fries. Mine came with the Crabby Patty, a grilled chicken breast (or burger, if you prefer) smothered in creamy crab dip and topped with cheddar cheese.


It was delicious! And look at the amount of food. Can you believe it was just $9.99?

Then, after our meal, we were treated to an amazing sunset over the bay.

This little seafood shack is local gem. Stop by if you’re ever in the area.

The Crusty Crab Seafood Shack is located at 2118 Harbor Drive in Greenbackville VA. Telephone  757-824-5437.  Due to limited seating, reservations are recommended for dinner, especially on the weekend.

The Scottish Walk Parade – Alexandria VA

The Scottish Walk Parade – Alexandria VA

Every year, generally the first weekend in December, Alexandria VA hosts a Scottish Walk Weekend and Parade. The weekend includes a variety of events from a home tour to a marketplace to a “Taste of Scotland” that features a Scotch tasting menu and, of course, Scotch whiskey.

And then there’s the parade. I’m normally not a big fan of parades – particularly those that take place in cold weather – but this one was a delight. Bagpipe music is one of those things that people either love or hate and I have both feet firmly planted in the LOVE camp. The parade included much more than just bagpipers, which I will get to in a moment, but for now let’s just appreciate men in kilts.

parade bagpipe band 6

parade bagpipe band 10

Even Santa was wearing a kilt and playing the pipes.

parade bagpiper looks like santa.jpg

The parade also included several dogs of different breeds. Naturally, there was a Scottish deerhound.

parade dog 2B

And this rare breed:

parade dog 4B

Modes of transportation were heavily featured, too. My favorites were a shiny red vintage Jaguar, and this:

parade carriage 2

There were some historical re-enactors there as well, with gorgeous costumes.

parade ren garb 1B.jpg

And weapons! You have to bring out your most impressive weapons to show them off every now and then.

parade really big sword 2.jpg

parade weapons 2.JPG

If you’re in the DC area in early December, make sure to catch this parade in Old Town Alexandria. Afterwards, you can shop at all the lovely stores and enjoy the small town ambiance (even though you’re not in a small town at all).

The Scottish Walk parade is held annually, generally the first Saturday in December. It, and the other Scottish weekend events, are put on by The Campagna Center, a non-profit organization that provides educational and social development programs.